Jun 27, 2017 Last Updated 3:47 PM, Jun 26, 2017
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Mangochi-Liwonde road cut-off

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Heavy rains have cut-off a section of the Mangochi – Liwonde road, inconveniencing motorists and all other road users, the Roads Authority (RA) has confirmed.

RA’s Public Relations Officer, Portia Kajanga, confirmed the development in an interview with Malawi News Agency (MANA).

 She said the affected area was Changali, the middle section of the 70KM stretch.

“Yes, I can confirm to you that the incessant rains have indeed destroyed the road at Changali which is a distance of 33kilometres from Mangochi and 37kilometres from Liwonde Turn – Off,” Kajanga said.

The road was cut–off in the early hours of Friday, according to Kajanga.

The PRO said the district experienced heavy rains in the past two days as predicted by the Department of Climate Change and Meteorological Services.

Nevertheless, Kajanga said a contractor was already on site to rebuild the affected road section while the authority’s engineers were assessing a possible alternative route which motorists would use while the road was being repaired.

“It will roughly take 2 to 3 days or less than that for the road to be open to traffic again,” she assured.

Following the persistent rains earlier this month, rivers flooded and cut – off some sections of the Monkey Bay–Golomoti road which has now been reopened.

In early January 2015, heavy rainstorms and floods hit 15 out of the 28 districts in Malawi such as Chikhwawa, Nsanje, Phalombe, Zomba, Rumphi, Karonga, Thyolo, Machinga, Mangochi, Ntcheu, Chiradzulu, Mulanje, Balaka, Salima and Blantyre.

The floods claimed 63 lives, and 153 people are still missing with government further estimating that at least 174,000 people were displaced.

Mangochi was developed as an agricultural center and has marine-engineering shops. Cash crops grown in the area include tobaccocotton, and groundnuts.

Rice and maize are intensively grown along the lakeshore, and commercial fishing is also important.

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